Should You Hire a Writing Coach? 7 Questions About Writing Coaches Answered

Writing Coach

Writing Coach

My short answer is yes.

When I wanted to get serious about writing I had a few marks against me: little formal training, dated experience, and few connections.

The advice online and in magazines was abundant and murky: join a writing group; just write and submit; find a mentor. Last I’d checked, our local Target did not have a large selection of critique circles or free mentors on the shelves.

Searching, I registered for a one-night class where our teacher’s credentials included published author and certified life coach.

Two weeks later, I still hadn’t written much and wondered if I’d ever feel like a “real” writer when I glanced over and saw the author’s card on a corner of my desk. I called and after a free consultation, signed up for my first session.

I’ve been attending weekly or bi-weekly sessions with my coach for the last year and the results are remarkable. But we’ll come back to that.

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Why Should You Consider Hiring a Coach?

Tiger Woods, NFL Quarterbacks, even Picasso all had personal teachers dedicated to their success.

“But writing is different. It’s art. It can’t be taught, you just have to do it.”

Writing is both art and craft. It’s also a goal, a pursuit, a vocation, a dream.

I wasn’t sure what I wanted to write or how to get started. I had no writing community and felt I didn’t have years to establish one. My goals have shifted many times throughout the past twelve months but I continue to see progress.

You sign your kids up for guitar lessons, hire batting coaches for your little leaguer, and may even treat yourself to a personal trainer. Why should your calling to write be any different? You deserve help in reaching your dreams if you feel you need it.

What Does a Coach Do and What Can You Expect?

Coaches are as varied as writers. There are book coaches who help you conceive of and shepherd a book to publication. There are writing coaches that act as tutors providing craft instruction and critiques of your work. Then there are more general coaches offering instruction, critiques, and a variety of goal setting and visioning tools to help guide your career.

I chose a Certified Life Coach who was a writing teacher and had extensive experience with the publishing world.

What Does a Typical Session Consist of?

First off, you should know that I almost always cry. I’m not sure if it’s with relief that I’m taking my own dreams seriously or gratitude that someone other than my supportive family believes in me. Thankfully, she does not charge extra for tissue.

Although writing is therapeutic, our sessions are not therapy. My coach, however, is a trained counselor which doesn’t hurt when dealing with the emotional task of writing from the heart.

Our weekly session starts with a centering and breathing exercise of which I was initially suspicious. This costs me money and I want to get better at writing, not hippie, woo woo stuff. I now look forward to this positive blessing of my writing life. I feel hope, determination and resolve settle over me.

Once centered, we discuss my results from last week, the good, the bad, and the ugly, and we set concrete goals for the upcoming week.  These may include word counts, submittals, time management, brainstorming, or big picture ideas.

We talk about managing the inner critic, coming up with new ideas, handling rejection, writing routines, family support, publications to query, dealing with negativity, etc.

I leave with a to-do list for the week and the wonderful feeling of investing in my dream. My coach believes in my ability and provides support and feedback via text, email, etc., outside of our regularly scheduled sessions.

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How Do You Tell if it’s Working?

We’ve all had the experience of a good fit; a teacher that seems to “get” your child’s personality; a hair dresser that knows one inch means just one inch; or a tax guy that helps you think out-of-the box with deductions.

Coaching is no different. Personality matters. Energy matters. Availability and pricing and credentials all matter.

But results are where it’s at. Here’s a few of the things I’ve achieved or experienced in one year that I’m convinced would have taken me longer on my own, or might not have happened at all:

  • Accepted as regular guest blogger at two websites including monthly posts, several published book reviews and author interviews including award winning novelists and NY Times Bestselling authors, published in Chicken Soup for the Soul, acceptance into Novel in a Year program at local studio, hired as correspondent for local newspaper, published flash fiction and personal essays, performed written piece for Live Lit event, selected to audition for Listen to Your Mother event
  • Encouraged establishment of a professional online presence including tips on: website, business cards, treating myself to headshots, social media accounts, blogging, etc.
  • Formulated a plan for conference/retreat/class attendance to improve my craft.
  • Instrumental in creating a working cover for my first novel (and convincing me it was a novel)
  • Established and tracked word count goals for WIP
  • Introductions to other writing professionals in our area including award winning authors, playwrights, screenwriters, etc.
  • Explanation of types of editing and assistance with recommendations and selection of editor for WIP
  • Access to well-established platform for advertising my proofreading and editing services resulting in paid assignments
  • Insight into what’s accepted/expected when pitching local editors resulting in several paid assignments and published clips
  • Assisted in arranging book signing for Chicken Soup for the Soul anthology
  • Invitation to participate in local author events as a speaker/presenter
  • Established a revision group, provides recommendations and insight on local classes
  • Sounding board for craft elements of projects in progress

Coaching has helped me keep my writing front and center all while traveling with a college athlete, working a full time job, and planning my daughter’s wedding.

How Much Does All This Cost?

If you search the internet you will find fees ranging from $100 to $150 per hour and an endless choice of “packages.” What’s important is your budget, comfort level, and your results. Trust your gut.

At a minimum, you should receive a free, no-pressure consultation and the flexibility to hold sessions in person, via skype, or by phone. Life gets hectic and flexibility is key. I prefer to pay as I go with no long-term commitment.

Don’t forget to check for certifications and references. The internet can tell you what certifying agencies are acceptable in your area.

What Do You Have to Lose?

If you’re stuck on a particular project or unsure how to get going at all, a free consultation could be the catalyst you need.

In my writing coach I have an advocate, a sympathetic ear, a well-established connection to the writing community, and an experienced publishing professional willing to provide guidance and critical feedback.

A reputable coach can be an invaluable resource. Mine asks tough questions and has challenged me to think bigger than I had the courage to do on my own.

Coaching might not be for everybody but I consider it time and money well-spent.

 Share Your Experience or Questions

Have you ever used a coach or considered it? Why or why not? Have you had a good or bad experience you can share?

 

 

 

3 Thoughts on “Should You Hire a Writing Coach? 7 Questions About Writing Coaches Answered

  1. Hi there! Any chance you could share with me who your writing coach is? She/he sounds like just what I’m looking for! angela@angelawatsonrobertson.com. Thanks! 🙂

How to Find a Writing Community

Finding a Writing Group
Finding a Writing Group

By Leesa from southtown, usa  Wikimedia Commons

You’re getting serious about this writing thing and you need to bounce ideas off someone. Your family’s eyes glaze over when you ask for their opinions on your new opening paragraph and your friends don’t understand why choosing a name for your main character is such a big deal. You need new people. Writing people. But how do you find them?

This was me last year. I was on the outside looking in and didn’t quite know where to start. I spent hours on various internet searches trying to find like-minded people. I’d like to save you some time.

While some websites like www.Meetup.com offer possibilities, the most promising options come from other social connections. In other words…it helps if you “know a guy.”

Hints for finding your community…

Take a class – Ask the students and teacher for recommendations and introductions. You chose the same class and have at least that in common. The teacher has some level of expertise which promises a wider circle of contacts. A good teacher will know the importance of a community and will want good word of mouth about the class. She will want to help.

Haven Writing Retreat

Photo by Author and Haven Host Laura Munson

Go to conferences/retreats – This works much like a class but in a more concentrated and often more intense environment. You can’t be a hermit though. Take down email addresses and cell phone numbers and reach out after you return home. Before I submitted my essay to Chicken Soup for the Soul, a fellow writer I met at a retreat ‘read it and offered invaluable feedback.

Hire a coach/mentor – Most offer a free consultation. A coach can be a sounding board for your writing goals, story ideas, or even help you conquer self-doubt.

All of the above require an investment of both time and money. If writing is your passion, you’re worth it.

Low-cost and free options also exist.

If coaching or classes are out of your financial reach, consider your local library. Many offer free monthly writing groups. These may have members at all different levels of skill or commitment. I found my first paid writing gig through the leader of my local library’s writing group.

Tell everyone you know that you’re a writer. Your friends and relatives have circles of people in all walks of life. Writers are a helpful bunch. A dear college friend introduced me to her cousin, a journalist. We met for coffee and she ended up passing on my name to her editor. A few months later, I was hired to do a freelance piece for their paper.

Social media is free and full of writers. It can be a huge time-suck so beware. If you’re disciplined and enjoy Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram – search their writing groups. Most have writers at all levels (both traditionally and self-published) who are happy to answer questions, suggest critique websites, or just boost your spirits on a tough writing day.

Websites like www.Scribophile.com and Women Writers, Women’s Books offer  active communities with opportunities to share work or even contribute content.

THE BOTTOM LINE

Writing can be lonely – but it doesn’t have to be. Finding a writing group or community requires that you take risks. The rewards are incisive feedback, links to opportunities, and old-fashioned friendship. Where did you find your people? If you have some hints or shortcuts not mentioned here, I’d love to hear about them in the comments!

4 Thoughts on “How to Find a Writing Community

  1. Great post. Yes, we writers need writers. I don’t think there are any shortcuts as what we need is to build trusting relationships where we feel safe to share our work and receive constructive criticism. Trust takes time to build.

    • Thanks so much for reading. Couldn’t agree more about your point on trusting. Writing makes us vulnerable and we need to feel that it’s a good fit before we can share.

  2. I love Women Writers, Women’s Books! I have been keeping in touch with this group, led by the fabulous Barbara Bos, on Facebook. What a fun group of amazing women who happen to be writers. They help me feel less alone as I am busy writing away. Thank you for posting this. I did attend a writing critique group for a while at a local library and I loved it, I’m just so busy writing that I haven’t gone back yet. I’m also fortunate to get lots of support from others in my writing adventure. Happy writing, everyone!

    • Barbara has been an inspiration! The main website is full of inspirational and informative pieces designed to help every level of writer. Like you, I love the support on the Facebook page. Thanks so much for taking the time to read and comment. Much appreciated – Best of luck with your writing!

Favorite Writing Resources, Books and Websites in 2014

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If your New Year Resolution was to get serious about your writing, then you’ve come to the right place! Last year I dug myself out of a frustrated pit of wanna-be-writing into the Land of Writers That Write. But I didn’t do it without help. Below is a list of the tools I found most inspiring, informative or at least entertaining. After all, writing can be a lonely endeavor and we all need to laugh more.

Disclaimer: These are the tools that helped me. I make no claims to their magical powers for muggles. I’ve received no compensation for mentioning them, nor do they necessarily want to lay claim to my transformation.

Books (new to me)

I’m endlessly fascinated by the lives of working writers. Invariably, I find out that they’re human beings that sit down and type or scribble on paper. That’s the one thing they all have in common. Yet, we all have different tastes and some offer savory quotes on creativity while others offer sturdy bites of craft. Some aren’t about writing specifically but shed light on the human condition–and my desire to suck more out of life–in a way that resonated with me.

 

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Books (revisited)

These are comfort books. Reminders to be brave and work hard for what we want.

Websites, Blogs and Podcasts

There you are, alone in your kitchen wondering how they do it? How do you find the secret door to the writers’ world? Google of course! The sites listed below are the ones I returned to time and again for the how-to stuff and the why-should-we stuff. They are the ones I visit during my lunch hour at the day job when the inner critic tells me I’m not a “real” writer.

  • Funds for Writers by C. Hope Clark – Excellent insights on craft and professionalism along with listings for paying markets, contests and submission calls.
  • Writers On Writing with Barbara DeMarco-Barrett – A weekly podcast with one or two interviews with authors on the craft and business of writing. Archives include past interviews for replay or download.
  • Helping Writers Become Authors by K.M. Weiland – Podcast with several years of archived episodes on specific elements of craft. Short and to the point.
  • Women Writers, Women’s Books – A mixture of craft, inspiration and business advice. This group also has a thriving social media presence and welcomes newcomers.
  • Writing Prompts That Don’t Suck – Really, they don’t. Wrote one of my favorite things based on a prompt featuring appetizers, Jesus and a unicorn.
  • Your Writer Platform – No, you don’t need a platform if you’re just starting out. But building a website and connecting online has provided writing opportunities that wouldn’t have been available to me otherwise. It’s also a nice place to call home.
  • The Write Life
  • Ellen Brock on YouTube – short videos on craft
  • Writers on Writing by Knopfdoubleday.com on YouTube

Doing of the thing quote

Organizations 

Social Media

Facebook – Established a professional page and connected with various writers groups. Two of my favorites require approval to join:

Women Writers, Women’s Books – Page of the website mentioned above.

Calls for Submissions – New posts everyday on established and emerging publications accepting work from all genres.

Twitter – My favorite for writers. Some hashtags to follow are #Amwriting, #Amreading, #FridayReads.

Google+ – I’m on it but it isn’t my favorite.

LinkedIn – Changed my profession to “Writer” and made it official!

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The Bottom Line

Reading about and tweeting other writers will not make you a writer. But these resources answered questions, taught me things and gave me outlets for my work. My hope is that sharing them with you might help you connect with a community of creative people that support your determination to write.

I’d love to hear from you. Let me know what you think about these or other resources you’ve come across. And treat yourself to a subscription of either Writer’s Digest or Poets & Writers magazines, or both!

 

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Laura Munson: I Gave Myself the Gift of a Haven Retreat, Now What?

Haven Retreat Muse

Last September, I flew to Montana where I spent several days with total strangers at Walking Lightly Ranch in the gorgeous mountain valley of Whitefish. I left with friends and inspiration.  Laura Munson, Haven Host and New York Times Bestselling Author of This is Not The Story You Think It Is: A Season of Unlikely Happiness, shared my essay and those of other retreaters on her personal blog.  If you’ve thought of attending a retreat, hers is one of the best in the country! Find out why here. This isn’t so much an advertisement as it is an invitation to say “why not?” If you’ve dreamed of treating yourself or testing yourself or just spending time with yourself, don’t wait!

Haven Retreat Muse

Flowers from a fellow writer and our Muse

 

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One of many gathering spots of Haven Retreat at Walking Lightly Ranch

 

Haven Retreat - Checking in

Beautiful Guest Rooms at Walking Lightly Ranch – Peace and quiet at Haven Retreat

 

Haven Retreat - Garden

Abundant gardens of Walking Lightly Ranch Provided Most of Our Food While at Haven Retreat

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After the First Draft or I Wrote a Book, Now What? The Editor’s Assessment

edit all the words

So did the editor like my novel? I promised to give you an update and share some information on selecting an editor. What follows is a breakdown of the assessment I received along with my Top 10 Tips for a Manuscript Assessment.
Book Cover

There are plenty of websites out there telling you how to select an editor and that will describe the different types of editing. If you’re a beginning writer, know that you can you can Google this just as easily as you can Google the most popular Christmas song of all time. Silent Night, by the way, is more than twice as popular as the #2 song.

I selected Warner Coaching, Inc. and Editor Brooke Warner to review my manuscript based on a referral from a published author I met in a writing class. During our email exchange, I got a feel for how prompt she was; how open to questions (I’m new, remember?!); what the report would look like; and how payment would be handled.  I paid about 40 percent when I sent the manuscript and the balance after I received the evaluation. The process took about three weeks from the time I emailed my manuscript.

What follows is a little bit like showing you my underwear

Brooke’s assessment started with an overview and then flowed into specifics. She was direct but encouraging and most of all, she was professional. Sections in italics are excerpted directly from the assessment.

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Overview

Tell Me What You Want is a solid effort at crafting a broadly appealing, suspenseful page-turner. At this stage, additional developmental editing will help you to ensure that the book is more streamlined and nuanced and that the characters who shepherd your readers through these pages are as distinctive as possible.

Key Themes/Reader Takeaways

Some of the valuable lessons that you share in the manuscript include the following-

I won’t give away all my secrets here. This section was 7 bullet points detailing what the editor thought my story was about. Good news – she got my messages.

Structure/Plot Flow

The book is structured ambitiously, as it alternates between different points of view, but very consistently. It is easy to follow and proceeds chronologically.

Details in this section included some recommendations regarding a main character and eliminating one POV for streamlining.

Pacing

The pacing of the book is fluid overall, but it suffers at times from unnecessary repetition of details and ideas that bog down the plot.

(p. 71): “Jenny had told her a couple of times that she’d done some amazing things in her life but Shelly never seemed satisfied.” We already know that Jenny feels this way, because Shelly has already shared this information with the reader.

The paragraph above is one of seven Brooke wrote citing specific page numbers and quotes directly from the manuscript along with her recommendations for improvement.

“So the writer who breeds more words than he needs, is making a chore for the reader who reads.” 
― Dr. Seuss

Dr.-Seuss

www.sockitmama.com

Character Development

Shelly’s character has the most dramatic arc in the story and is well done, as is Greg’s. In particular, Jenny’s character, albeit likable, feels quite one-note, which is part of the reason why her point of view doesn’t add significant value to the narrative. A developmental editor can help you to tease out each of these key characters’ unique attributes to make them more distinctive.

The editor included several paragraphs of examples here both positive and those needing revision.

Scene Development

You have a good instinct for developing scenes, most of which are fluid and well wrought in this book. The primary exceptions are the scenes involving the following plotlines:

Again, specific examples of unbelievable coincidences or unlikely events were detailed with page numbers, quotes and recommendations for improvement.

Dialogue

The book’s dialogue is quite strong overall. It feels natural and both true to life and true to your characters’ distinct personalities. My one recommendation in this area is to eliminate the use of the nicknames…etc. Eliminating this language from these women’s conversations would serve both conversational flow and character development.

Brooke commented not only on the wording that sounded forced but also how it didn’t mesh with some characters’ personalities that were previously established.

Point of View

Your current approach of using three alternating points of view is successful in the sense that it is consistent and comprehensible. However, I do not think that Jenny’s point of view enhances the manuscript significantly (although I would not remove her character from the story entirely).  In addition, on p. 81, there’s an abrupt POV shift.

The editor pointed out why she thought this POV should be eliminated and suggested either reworking it myself or with the help of a developmental editor. She explained why it wasn’t working or wasn’t necessary as well.

Tone and Style

Your writing style and tone are consistent but at times you employ clichéd language. In addition, you sometimes rely on telling the reader what your characters are feeling, rather than showing it.

Here she gave page numbers and quotes as well as suggestions for more nuanced language and fresher descriptions. Much of this I would have caught as I began revising but it is helpful to have the examples to follow as I check through the manuscript.

Grammar and Punctuation

The book needs a medium to heavy copyedit after all of the developmental work is complete, to fix grammar, punctuation, and formatting errors.

Was it Worth it and What’s Next?

In a more extensive developmental edit, the editor would go into even more detail. This was the right step for me taking my goals into consideration. I am using this book as a learning process. I wanted to get professional feedback from someone that had read the entire manuscript instead of just excerpts. Now I know what my strengths are and where I need to focus for the most improvement.

My revision process has started with character profiles. I’m trying to make my characters more three-dimensional. I have applied and been accepted to the Novel In a Year program at Story Studio and my plan is to work on and finish the second draft in this class.  So that’s where I’m at. Leave me a note to let me know where you are with your latest project.

Here are my Top 10 Tips for a ManuscriptAssessment

  1.  Ask for referrals, send emails or call explaining your project and what you need
  2. Make sure you understand what is included, ask questions
  3. Decide what level of help you need
  4. Receive feedback with an open mind – anything can be fixed once it’s on the page.
  5. Pay on time. This might be your first time dealing with professionals in the publishing industry. You want to project professionalism.
  6. KEEP WRITING. Whether it’s short stories or an outline for a new project, keep working while the editor is reading your manuscript and preparing the assessment. Don’t sit and wait.
  7. Read it and ignore it. That’s right. You will be curious and anxious and excited and possibly distressed. Read it and then let it, and your ego, rest. Go on to something else and come back to the assessment when you are ready to begin revisions.
  8. Follow the editor’s advice. You paid him. He’s an expert. Don’t make the mistake of ignoring his advice.
  9. Don’t follow the editor’s advice. It’s  your story and if you think they’re dead wrong about a beloved character or plot twist, follow your gut. Take a risk.
  10. Exercise your rewriting muscles remembering that anything can be improved. Make use of the information you received for future projects as well.

 

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Story Club Founder Dana Norris Chats About Writing, Performing and Chicago’s Live Lit Scene

story club

Dana Norris is a writer and performer living in Chicago. She is the founder of the Story Club Franchise and editor-in-chief of Story Club Magazine. I enrolled in a writing workshop this summer at Story Studio Chicago called Live Lit Bootcamp. Dana was my teacher. I was terrified but she was encouraging, enthusiastic and specific.

She’s a new mom and agreed to talk with me – during baby’s nap time when she could have been napping herself – and share some insight on what it takes to be a published writer, performer, editor, teacher and all around phenom in Chicago’s vibrant storytelling scene.

Click on the audio player below for the full interview and/or scroll down for highlights.

Note: Depending on your browser, you may see ‘download’ instead of a play button. Clicking on download will give you the option to play the file online (without actually downloading the file).

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HIGHLIGHTS

Dana Norris on becoming a writer and starting Story Club

I kept waiting to be chosen. I kept waiting for someone to notice how brilliant I was and be like ‘let me give you a book deal.’ I was waiting to be discovered. It didn’t occur to me that I could just make the thing that I wish existed.

Why she loves Live Lit

After a night of listening to true stories, people generally feel more connected. I believe the show does make lives better. The best thing is they’re like I want to come back and I want to tell now. It’s like a virus…a good virus!

On writing nonfiction and live storytelling

I had all these tools from short stories and I realized I could apply them to actual events.

Everyone has a story. You need to show people your world very clearly and cleanly so they want to go in.

It’s an argument. Stay here with me and go with me. I have to give you reasons to stay.

Advice on getting published

Submit. Send things away. Do it. There is no reason you should not be published. If you’re saying what you came to say and you’re doing it in a way that’s interesting, people want to publish it. So get published. You just have to keep trying and eventually you will be.

Search for editors that are going to push you and try to make you better.

Nonfiction craft and the personal essay

The most important thing…is to answer the question ‘what’s the big fucking deal?’ An essay needs reflection. Why does it interest me? Why should a stranger care? Sometimes you don’t know the answer to that question yet. You’re trying to drill down to some previously unspoken truth about the subject that only you can relate to the reader through your own experiences or through what you’ve thought about.

The word essay means to think on the page. You need to think.

On handling rejection and submitting

I have a current goal of 100 rejections this year. I’ve submitted 75 essays (same essay sometimes, multiple times) and at last count, I’ve had 8 acceptances. I’ve received 11 soft no’s…which are very important! I need to tell writers if you get a soft no – that is not a rejection. It’s considered an almost yes. I’ve received 60-some no’s.

Don’t take no as an answer. Take it as an opening to negotiations.

Best advice I’ve gotten is it’s paperwork. Treat it like paying your bills.

Her writing routine

I am deadline motivated. I like to write for a thing that is due on a day.

I hate the cult of busyness. A thing I heard recently is you have exactly as many hours in the day as Beyonce.

On making a living writing

I don’t want to belittle the dream but I don’t quite understand it. You love it so you’re going to do it anyway, so just do it anyway.

Paying writers is incredibly important. Writers should work more on ‘you should be so lucky to have me and you need to pay me.’

On writing programs and the MFA

They need to change to accommodate the real world of submissions. Editors have no time and are mostly volunteers. You have one paragraph. You need to make your piece more interesting than their lives in the first paragraph.

You don’t need to go to an MFA program to become a writer. If you want to write a book, write the book. What it is [an MFA] is just immersion and you can immerse yourself.

One thing beginners should know

Write the check and then make your ass cash it. Don’t wait for permission.

 

For more on Dana, her upcoming performances and links to her work in the The Rumpus, McSweeney’s, Role Reboot and others, checkout her website at www.DanaNorris.net.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5 Thoughts on “Story Club Founder Dana Norris Chats About Writing, Performing and Chicago’s Live Lit Scene

  1. I like what Dana said about submitting just being paperwork. I’ve made 67 submissions this year.

    • Wow, 67?! That’s impressive! A worthwhile goal – do you track and if so do you mind sharing how? Thanks for tuning in – I think she has some great tips for beginners and pros too!

  2. A large binder contains:
    -a list of submissions (date, title of story and publisher)
    (After I hear from the publisher, I add a ‘yes’ or ‘no’, as well as the date)
    -rejection letters received
    -plans for future submissions

  3. Thank you for your interest, Suzanne. And best wishes for your continued success.

Lori Rader-Day, Author of The Black Hour, Shares Advice for Writers

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Who doesn’t love a good mystery?

A few weeks ago, I had the pleasure of taking my third class this year from Story Studio Chicago.  Our “drill seargent” for Mystery  Bootcamp was none other than debut author, Lori Rader-Day.  Lori’s first published novel The Black Hour, was released in July and has earned starred reviews from Publishers Weekly and Library Journal just to name a few.

I bought a copy of Lori’s book (the cover is intriguing – just look at the way that beam of light shines through the trees and onto the “o” in “hour”) and later contacted her for an interview.

You can catch both my review and Lori’s great advice to new writers at www.Blogcritics.org.

“If anyone ever says anything about “the muse,” just back away slowly. Write when you can and when you can’t. Write. Don’t wait for some fairy to land on your shoulder. The only way to get any musing done is to do it yourself.”  ~ Lori Rader-Day

For more information on Lori, visit her website www.loriraderday.com.

 

 

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