Could You be Addicted to Feedback?

criticism
criticism

Creative Commons http://www.bookandnegative.com/

What are the signs?

I have this mentor/friend who thinks I have a problem. She’s traditionally published over a dozen novels and teaches a wildly successful fiction workshop in a major city.

Twice, she has told me to just finish my current draft without getting more feedback.

What kind of feedback am I talking about? Not just your garden variety writing or critique group comments that take place in a workshop setting. (But I partake in that, too!)

After my second full draft, I realized my beginning needed work. I rewrote the first forty pages then got an assessment from a professional editor.

I rewrote those pages again incorporating the changes suggested by the editor (also a well-known novelist).

Next, I took part in a story workshop with an award-winning playwright and realized I hadn’t quite nailed my “what’s this about.”

Most authors, whether they’re screenwriters or novelists, eventually have to distill their project to the infamous log-line.

So, I spent some time on that. Then rewrote my outline making sure I was faithful to the gist of my story.

Then I rewrote the first few chapters to more faithfully follow the outline, and—yep, you guessed it—submitted those for feedback.

All of the feedback I received was spot-on and useful.

So, what makes me think I might need a 12-step program for writers seeking feedback?

Last week, the first mentor I mentioned above asked how my project was going. I was all positive: “Great, still working on it. Incorporating feedback on a new beginning, etc.”

And she asked: “Haven’t you already done that?”

Yes. Three times.

She was confused. She told me to knock it off. That it was just procrastination masquerading as “improving my craft.” She told me to just finish the draft using everything I know how to do. On my own. Like, without a guide. Alone. Solo.

start-and-finish

Creative Commons http://www.dumblittleman.com

I know, pushy, right? So, I said I ok. I committed. No more feedback.

Then I texted her and asked if going cold turkey included getting comments from my writing group.

Her exact response: “OMG. Yes, that counts.”

I’ve had limited time to work on my draft over the last two weeks. I have a post-op son at home that requires twice-daily “wound-care.” And, yes, that’s as disgusting as it sounds.

A dear relative is in the ICU.

I have a day job. I have laundry and meals to prepare and groceries to procure.

(Einstein ought to have tackled that job. The most inefficient system in the modern age: take item off shelf, put item in cart, take item out of cart, place item on conveyor, place item into bag, place bag into cart, take bag out of cart, place bag into car, take bag out of car, take bag into house, take item out of bag, place item onto shelf. Seriously—473 steps for groceries. Aaaaaaggggghhhhhh!)

I’m supposed to find time to exfoliate and floss and meditate and correspond with family. And when do I squeeze in watching VEEP or Silicon Valley on TV?

On my lunch hour today, I sat in my car and read my first two chapters out loud. I listened for the cadence of my sentences. I made notes about two pages of dialogue with almost no exposition or setting. I made notes on two page of exposition and setting with no action or dialogue.

Such is the life of a writer on her first book. I know I’m not alone. I know I’m not the only one who has attempted this while also having to figure out how to pick a ripe, juicy cantaloupe from the produce section.

Sometimes knowing you’re not alone helps. Sometimes it doesn’t.

To further suck time from editing my novel, I signed up months ago for an online workshop. Our current module is “Unhooking from Praise and Criticism.”

This dovetails with my feedback obsession for my work in progress.

One of the common pitfalls of first-time novelists is starting over, never getting to the end of the first draft.

But I avoided that trap! I outwitted my newbie-ness and made sure I got to The End on that first draft. And on the second.

The remaining drafts? You guessed it. I keep going back and working on the beginning. Sometimes, this is important if you still don’t know what your story is. And, yes, there’s no right way and blah, blah, blah.

But by sending out the first twenty pages, or the first five chapters or  just this one section for editorial assessments and feedback, I’m avoiding the inevitable.

I have to finish the f$#king draft I’m working on. Not the next one. This one.

Epiphany-ish, no?

And I know how to make it better. I don’t know if anyone will want to publish it, but I do know how to make it better.

There should be a drive-thru service where workers (trained editors of course) scan your latest output of words and hand you a printout that declares Congratulations, these four pages are working. Carry on!

Feedback

Creative Commons http://media.trusper.net

I just don’t know if I’m doing it right. Four nights ago, I was sure it sucked. I decided to just race through the draft maniacally so I could put it in a trunk under my bed and get on with the next, better book.

Several months ago, I was trying to decide if I should send a current draft out for feedback and I asked my wise mentor person if she thought it was a good idea.

She replied, “Have you already done everything to it that you know how to do?”

The answer was an easy No.

What a question! What’s she hinting at?

You guessed it—she suspected my feedback addiction back then. But I had to be ready to quit.

So, I’m taking it one day at a time. Not sharing pages with anyone. Just working away. In my writing room. At my writing desk. In my car. In the coffee shop.

Alone.

In one of my favorite books about the experience of writing a book (Yes, there is such a thing, and it’s fabulous. How’s that for book-y geekdom?), many pitfalls and stages are explained. Writing a book is a journey.

It’s possible I’m making it harder than it has to be. It’s possible I’m doing it all wrong. It’s possible that I’ll relapse. But for now. I’m just writing. And most days, I don’t want to stop.

 

 

 

 

4 Thoughts on “Could You be Addicted to Feedback?

  1. Tracey Curzon-Manners on June 7, 2016 at 3:39 am said:

    Suzanne! Your words come alive and I relate to every single sentence… and I agree with your mentor. Trust yourself and silence the inner critic. I understand the need to feedback, I’ve even been tempted myself but deep down I also know what I really want is approval and only I can give me that.

    Leave the feedback to your readers – they’re going to love you as much as I loved reading this.

  2. Tracey Curzon-Manners on June 7, 2016 at 3:40 am said:

    ‘ the need to seek feedback’ Tch

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A Fine Mess: Writing and the Scientific Method

Writing is Scientific

I’m sitting in a middle school gymnasium wondering how I could have forgotten the deafening, high-pitched squeal produced by over one hundred 13-year-olds. My daughter, a research biologist, coaches a science Olympiad team on invasive species and my husband and I have come to cheer them on.

Bob the Bubble Man entertains the students waiting for their final scores and medals to be handed out. He repeats over and over that science is all about asking questions. If we want to make this bubble bounce on our hand, what’s the best way? Should we use a dry hand, a wet hand, or maybe a gloved hand?

Bob the Bubble Man

Writing fiction is all about asking questions. How would our protagonist react to this situation? What is the more dramatic choice in this scene? Would telling the story from a different point of view reveal more character?

My daughter’s team scores two big victories and over a celebratory dinner, I chat with the head coach, a Ph.D. entomologist, about projects she and my daughter are developing in their day jobs for the same scientific company, and I update her on the progress I’ve made on my novel. She’s a big reader and curious about the writing process.

I share the stops and starts, how detours down one path have led me to revelations about changing the point of view, even the tense I’m using to tell my chosen story. How I’ve narrowed down—finally and after three full drafts—what my story is actually about. How I feel like I have the tenuous grasp of a spine that I’m building on and how all the “mistakes” have gotten me to this point.

Writing is Scientific

She nods knowingly and shares how she must coax the junior scientists on her team into making mistakes on purpose. She encourages them to pursue unusual avenues in the hopes of uncovering something new.

Sometimes, she’s frustrated with the younger scientists who, having mastered one testing method, become comfortable and want to stick with it. She has to nudge and push them out of their comfort zone.

Writers have comfort zones, too. We identify as pantsers or outliners. Like scientists, we can benefit from trying different methods or inventing new methods.

As a former die-hard pantser, I hesitated to use even a beat sheet, but in later drafts, outlines have helped me shape my character’s focus and purpose.

The doc reminds me of a development project she worked on and how the genesis of the idea came to her in the shower. She asked “what if” questions and hit on a unique solution that continues to pay off.

She leads a team of researchers and is responsible for encouraging them to move past their fear, to encourage them to look at what would they try “if they weren’t afraid of being wrong,” of wasting time or resources. She teaches them to expect dead ends and detours. It means they’re exploring possibilities.

Back to Bob the Bubble guy. He asks the kids to predict how best to bounce a bubble on their hands. He recruits three volunteers and they try all three options. Turns out the dry hand pops the bubble, the wet hand causes the bubble to stick and on the third try, on the gloved hand, the bubble bounces over and over, glistening under the gym lights.

Cool Scientists

Cool Scientists!

What would you try if you weren’t afraid of being wrong, of wasting time? What would you create?

 

 

4 Thoughts on “A Fine Mess: Writing and the Scientific Method

  1. great observation!

  2. Painting/drawing. I have it all in my mind, but it doesn’t ever come out that well in reality! Perhaps I am afraid of being crap at it! So I don’t try. Like a true hedgehog.

    Thanks for dragging me out from under the safety of the leaf pile!

    A xx

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New Stuff to Read!

Bang2Write

Excited to be featured on Lucy V Hay’s Bang2Write site offering writing craft tips for screenwriters and novelists.  Please share if you like the post!

Also, my review for Eighth Wonder: The Thomas Bethune Story can be found on Blogcritics this week! Stay tuned for a cool interview with the author, Anita M. Cal.

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Revisions: Lessons of the Second Draft

Frustrated Writer

Frustrated Writer

In my wildly popular* post “I Wrote A Book, Now What” I shared what happens after typing “The End” on a first draft.

*Wildly popular means read by someone other than my mother and best friend.

Here’s an update on my progress.

Like sex or Godiva Chocolate Cheesecake, the learning curve for writing a novel is something you have to experience for yourself. No writer can convey what the process will be like for you because the process is never the same.

Cheesecake_GodivaChoco

Gratuitous photo of chocolate sex

Similarly, no recounting evokes the mental anguish and befuddlement of the actual undertaking. Hence, most unsuccessful novelists simply shelve their hideous first efforts and move on to the next project, or give up all together.

My bio on Twitter is accurate, I am pear-shaped and pushing 50. I’m determined to improve so I’ve got to face the fear of the second draft on this project. Then and only then, I will decide if the story is worth further effort.

So far, my revision process includes 50 new pages of material and a 30-page handwritten outline of the entire novel as it currently exists.

I needed to know the present world of my characters and show them interacting more before I start them on their journey of transformation. Sounds easy enough, right? Not so fast. In the new material, my main character is now 10 years younger and childless. Lesson: Generating new material often presents new problems for the writer that have to be resolved throughout the entire draft.

The first draft for a pantser (writing by the “seat of your pants” vs. planning) is like magic. Things just flow out through seemingly no effort of your own. But 290 pages of information is a lot to remember which is why characters end up with different names half way through and you can’t remember who’s related, etc.

writers-block

There was so much for me to learn, I applied and was accepted to a Novel in a Year program. The writing teacher strongly suggested I give outlining a try. Ugh.  Lesson: Outlining at some point in the process is incredibly useful for consistency and as a reference for rewriting.

So how do you do it? A typical day of revision is waking up early, making a cup of tea, stretching in the kitchen and then sitting down at my desk. I open up the word document and reread the previous material from my last session. Then I review my editor’s comments and decide what to tackle for that session. Either I’m adding a new scene, removing a section, correcting errors, etc.

Brainstorming, questioning, making lists of possibilities are all part of my process right now. Will I leave the kids in the story? Did I show enough interaction and conflict or tension between the main character and her husband in the first chapter? How am I going to tie the last chapter of the new material to the old material?

At first I was sure I was lost. I put off sitting down in front of the laptop. I didn’t know how to wrestle the three-inch stack of papers and notes into submission. What kind of an incompetent writer doesn’t know the age of her main character?

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What I’ve heard, read and by the grace of the writing gods have come to internalize is that as long as I’m still working at it, learning and trying new things, I’m writing. Lesson: This is my process for this book so it is the right process. The struggle means I’m learning.

If you’re struggling with a first draft of a novel or short story or essay, congratulations. You’re writing.

(All photos via creative commons – click on photo for link)

One Thought on “Revisions: Lessons of the Second Draft

  1. barb armstrong on April 30, 2015 at 7:15 am said:

    Congratulations, you’re writing!!!

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Resting on a Laurel or What to do After Your Submission is Accepted

Sara's quote
Motivational Quote for Avoiding Writer's Block After Publishing Sara Connell Author

How to Avoid Writer’s Block After Publishing

What do you do when you have a success with your writing? Do you quickly move on to the next action step or do you sit and enjoy it? There’s something to be said for stopping to smell the roses – but not if you fall asleep wallowing in them. You’ll get pricked and bleed. It will be ugly. Trust me.

Last week, I got some exciting news that a story I submitted for a popular anthology was accepted. A PR firm contacted me and soon I had all kinds of attention-getting diversions!

I know my own shortcomings and confessed to a mentor that as I was posting the good news on Facebook, a part of me knew I’d waste endless hours basking in the “likes” and “shares” and “comments” surrounding my success. When would I write?

A certain amount of fear joined the excitement; fear that my biggest publishing success so far would be my last.

We made a plan to stay in action. Here’s a few things you can do if you find yourself with a “win” that threatens to deter you from a bigger goal.

3 Steps to Keep Your Success from Becoming Writer’s Block

1. Set aside a certain amount of time to pat yourself on the back via social media or other means.

2. Decide on a next step before you click “post.”

3. Next steps can include any of the following:

  • Deadline for new submission
  • Revision time on a work-in-progress (WIP)
  • Chapter read in a book on craft.

4. Use affirmations to remind yourself “That is not all the music that is in you.”

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After the First Draft or I Wrote a Book, Now What? The Editor’s Assessment

edit all the words

So did the editor like my novel? I promised to give you an update and share some information on selecting an editor. What follows is a breakdown of the assessment I received along with my Top 10 Tips for a Manuscript Assessment.
Book Cover

There are plenty of websites out there telling you how to select an editor and that will describe the different types of editing. If you’re a beginning writer, know that you can you can Google this just as easily as you can Google the most popular Christmas song of all time. Silent Night, by the way, is more than twice as popular as the #2 song.

I selected Warner Coaching, Inc. and Editor Brooke Warner to review my manuscript based on a referral from a published author I met in a writing class. During our email exchange, I got a feel for how prompt she was; how open to questions (I’m new, remember?!); what the report would look like; and how payment would be handled.  I paid about 40 percent when I sent the manuscript and the balance after I received the evaluation. The process took about three weeks from the time I emailed my manuscript.

What follows is a little bit like showing you my underwear

Brooke’s assessment started with an overview and then flowed into specifics. She was direct but encouraging and most of all, she was professional. Sections in italics are excerpted directly from the assessment.

edit all the words

 www.memegen.com

Overview

Tell Me What You Want is a solid effort at crafting a broadly appealing, suspenseful page-turner. At this stage, additional developmental editing will help you to ensure that the book is more streamlined and nuanced and that the characters who shepherd your readers through these pages are as distinctive as possible.

Key Themes/Reader Takeaways

Some of the valuable lessons that you share in the manuscript include the following-

I won’t give away all my secrets here. This section was 7 bullet points detailing what the editor thought my story was about. Good news – she got my messages.

Structure/Plot Flow

The book is structured ambitiously, as it alternates between different points of view, but very consistently. It is easy to follow and proceeds chronologically.

Details in this section included some recommendations regarding a main character and eliminating one POV for streamlining.

Pacing

The pacing of the book is fluid overall, but it suffers at times from unnecessary repetition of details and ideas that bog down the plot.

(p. 71): “Jenny had told her a couple of times that she’d done some amazing things in her life but Shelly never seemed satisfied.” We already know that Jenny feels this way, because Shelly has already shared this information with the reader.

The paragraph above is one of seven Brooke wrote citing specific page numbers and quotes directly from the manuscript along with her recommendations for improvement.

“So the writer who breeds more words than he needs, is making a chore for the reader who reads.” 
― Dr. Seuss

Dr.-Seuss

www.sockitmama.com

Character Development

Shelly’s character has the most dramatic arc in the story and is well done, as is Greg’s. In particular, Jenny’s character, albeit likable, feels quite one-note, which is part of the reason why her point of view doesn’t add significant value to the narrative. A developmental editor can help you to tease out each of these key characters’ unique attributes to make them more distinctive.

The editor included several paragraphs of examples here both positive and those needing revision.

Scene Development

You have a good instinct for developing scenes, most of which are fluid and well wrought in this book. The primary exceptions are the scenes involving the following plotlines:

Again, specific examples of unbelievable coincidences or unlikely events were detailed with page numbers, quotes and recommendations for improvement.

Dialogue

The book’s dialogue is quite strong overall. It feels natural and both true to life and true to your characters’ distinct personalities. My one recommendation in this area is to eliminate the use of the nicknames…etc. Eliminating this language from these women’s conversations would serve both conversational flow and character development.

Brooke commented not only on the wording that sounded forced but also how it didn’t mesh with some characters’ personalities that were previously established.

Point of View

Your current approach of using three alternating points of view is successful in the sense that it is consistent and comprehensible. However, I do not think that Jenny’s point of view enhances the manuscript significantly (although I would not remove her character from the story entirely).  In addition, on p. 81, there’s an abrupt POV shift.

The editor pointed out why she thought this POV should be eliminated and suggested either reworking it myself or with the help of a developmental editor. She explained why it wasn’t working or wasn’t necessary as well.

Tone and Style

Your writing style and tone are consistent but at times you employ clichéd language. In addition, you sometimes rely on telling the reader what your characters are feeling, rather than showing it.

Here she gave page numbers and quotes as well as suggestions for more nuanced language and fresher descriptions. Much of this I would have caught as I began revising but it is helpful to have the examples to follow as I check through the manuscript.

Grammar and Punctuation

The book needs a medium to heavy copyedit after all of the developmental work is complete, to fix grammar, punctuation, and formatting errors.

Was it Worth it and What’s Next?

In a more extensive developmental edit, the editor would go into even more detail. This was the right step for me taking my goals into consideration. I am using this book as a learning process. I wanted to get professional feedback from someone that had read the entire manuscript instead of just excerpts. Now I know what my strengths are and where I need to focus for the most improvement.

My revision process has started with character profiles. I’m trying to make my characters more three-dimensional. I have applied and been accepted to the Novel In a Year program at Story Studio and my plan is to work on and finish the second draft in this class.  So that’s where I’m at. Leave me a note to let me know where you are with your latest project.

Here are my Top 10 Tips for a ManuscriptAssessment

  1.  Ask for referrals, send emails or call explaining your project and what you need
  2. Make sure you understand what is included, ask questions
  3. Decide what level of help you need
  4. Receive feedback with an open mind – anything can be fixed once it’s on the page.
  5. Pay on time. This might be your first time dealing with professionals in the publishing industry. You want to project professionalism.
  6. KEEP WRITING. Whether it’s short stories or an outline for a new project, keep working while the editor is reading your manuscript and preparing the assessment. Don’t sit and wait.
  7. Read it and ignore it. That’s right. You will be curious and anxious and excited and possibly distressed. Read it and then let it, and your ego, rest. Go on to something else and come back to the assessment when you are ready to begin revisions.
  8. Follow the editor’s advice. You paid him. He’s an expert. Don’t make the mistake of ignoring his advice.
  9. Don’t follow the editor’s advice. It’s  your story and if you think they’re dead wrong about a beloved character or plot twist, follow your gut. Take a risk.
  10. Exercise your rewriting muscles remembering that anything can be improved. Make use of the information you received for future projects as well.

 

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After the First Draft (for New Writers), An Update: The Editor Responds and How to Choose an Editor

In my first post about completing the first draft of a novel, I promised to give you an update on what happens next. I keep my promises:

Book Cover

Late last night I sat with the family as they watched The Walking Dead. I don’t watch. I hate Zombies. I love Vampires, but that’s a different post.

Hoping to distract myself from the gnashing sound of zombie teeth on flesh, I checked my email via my phone and there it was – the professional editor’s assessment of my first novel!

I gave the email a once-over and was encouraged enough to open the attachment. The editor sent a five-page breakdown of what worked for her and what didn’t.

Stay tuned for a synopsis of the editor’s opinion and recommendations along with my next steps.

I will include:

  • Different types of editing available
  • What an assessment covers
  • Why I selected an assessment
  • How to choose your own editor
  • Results – worth the money or not
  • What’s next?

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After the First Draft OR I Wrote a Book…Now What?

Suzanne Brazil Novel - Work in Progress

 FOR NEW WRITERS ONLY (or My Relatives)

“What’s happening with your book?”

I’ve been getting this question a lot so I decided to share an update.  For those of you feigning interest (family and friends) or for new writers wondering what happens after the first draft of a first novel, read on for some insight into the process.

Ernest Hemingway - making crap

Ernest Hemingway – making crap

Sh*tty First Draft

Turns out, completing the first draft of a novel is just the beginning.

When I triumphantly typed “The End” and climbed out of my writing cave, I strode into the kitchen with tears in my eyes.  I demanded a hug from my perpetually perplexed husband and told him “this is a big deal.” And it was.

But it wasn’t the whole deal.

One axiom shared by writers of all genres and all levels of expertise is:  The first draft is sh*t.  Just ask Hemingway or Anne Lamott. (If you’re a new writer and you don’t know who she is WHY ARE YOU READING THIS?  Drop everything and run, run I tell you – to get Bird by Bird.)

Another rule of thumb is that after you finish a first draft, you are supposed to hide it.  Distance yourself so you can come back to it with a more objective outlook.

I finished  “Tell Me What You Want” on August 31.  It’s on the shorter side for a novel at 65,000 words (245 pages).  Turns out there’s guidelines for stuff like that.  A novel is typically 80,000 + words.  Who knew?

The First Read Through

It wasn’t until the second week of October that I read it through for the first time.  I’d sent a copy to both of my sisters and my best friend knowing they would all be supportive.  I felt a panic attack coming on when I got ready to read it myself.

2014-08-26_14-02-31-1

Covers have sh*tty first drafts too!

My chief concerns were in this order:

  1. It will suck
  2. It will suck so bad, I won’t even finish reading it.
  3. It will suck so bad I will never write another thing.

Completely daunted, I read it as a reader.  Without editing as I went. All of my fears were not unfounded.  Parts of it sucked a lot.

But some parts were decidedly un-sucky.  These parts are what is known in the industry as “my darlings” and the general wisdom is that these darlings must eventually be slaughtered (or for the less dramatic of you, deleted).

Does This Novel Make Me Look Fat?

What most writers need is honest, experienced critique partners and I don’t have those yet.  What I did have was a couple of published authors that I had met and who, as part of a class and later a writing retreat, offered to edit excerpts of works in progress.

The feedback I received was helpful, depressing and amazing often on the same page.  Turns out, I have a “voice” – again, who knew?  Also turns out I knew next to nothing about how a novel is constructed.

construction scaffold

Caution – Novel Under Construction

If I’m being honest, this came as a little bit of a surprise.  I mean, I’ve read thousands of novels. I’ve studied English Lit and even tested out of a couple of college literature courses.  None of these prepared me for the fact that a novel is a very specific thing with specific rules that you have to follow unless you’re good enough to break all the rules.

Novel construction was not something taught in any of my previous courses.  Most of them were about awakening your creativity.  That’s not where I needed help.

construction coneUnder Construction – Danger Falling Hopes and Dreams

To start with, if you’re a casual or even avid reader, it might not occur to you that novels are written in scenes.  Like a screenplay but different.  Go on, go get that trashy romance novel or mystery with the cat on the cover.  Alternatively, grab that suspense novel with the shadowy trees and bloody hand.  Either will do.

If it kept you reading until the end, it’s a pretty safe bet that the book you’re reading is made up of scenes – interactions between characters or a single character doing something.  They have thoughts, sure, but 20 pages of your heroine describing the grass and flower beds does not a published book make.

A lot of this stuff about how novels are made I began to learn during the process of writing the first draft.  Logically, the last third of my book is better than the first third.  That’s a relief.

Writing IS Re-Writing

340px-L.N.Tolstoy_Prokudin-Gorsky

Tolstoy (Exhausted after draft #10?)

Another axiom for writers is that writing is a craft that can be learned, and each stab you take at it usually improves the product.  I tried not to think of stabbing myself when I thought of the time required to rewrite what I’d just written.

On the advice of some of the pros I’ve recently met, I decided to send my manuscript to an editor for an assessment.  Editors offer different levels of services and what I was looking for is a complete read-through of my draft.  The result will be a professional (if subjective) evaluation of what is working in my book, what needs to be reworked and recommendations on the best way to approach a rewrite.

Did you know that Tolstoy rewrote War and Peace 10 times?  Ten complete drafts of the same giant book.  Listening to some of  my favorite author interviews confirms that at a minimum, four or five drafts are common.  One author recently published a critically acclaimed novel after 19 drafts.

Don’t Fall for the New Project

Maybe I’ll Just Start a New One…

Working authors caution against the siren song of the new project.  Seems that a majority of writers agree. It’s easier to get started and write the first draft of a project than to go back and revise a work in progress.

IMAG3560

Actual Revision Shot – Do not try this at home

There are a few exceptions to every rule but I know my own weaknesses.  To me, the act of sitting down and spewing out my brain-droppings on the page or screen is a little bit like magic.  I see a prompt or wake up with an idea, a blank page, and my fingers just start dancing.  Invariably, the alarm goes off and I shut down the laptop to head off to my day job, leaving the tail end of my thoughts and a project likely to remain unfinished.

In other words, I’ve decided not to start another full-length book project until I make some decisions about this one.  I will hear back from my editor in a month or so and have pretty much committed to at least one more complete draft.

Never Never Never Give Up!

I have much to learn and I want to see something I’ve molded take shape into a better version.  In the meantime, I continue to write most every day.  I have a couple of short stories and essays in the works.  I update my blog, review books, interview authors and keep my ideas for new projects in special notebooks until their time comes. I continue to study the craft.

With the help of a friend, we created a working cover for the novel so I could remind myself that I did write an entire book.  I share that cover with you now.  Many first novels languish in drawers as writers take what they’ve learned and apply it to sophomore efforts they are less embarrassed to share with the masses.

Book Cover

I’m not embarrassed at all.  Even the crappy parts of this first effort are all mine.  They’re proof.  I put out effort and the result was a book.  I wrote a book.  Yay me! You can too.

4 Thoughts on “After the First Draft OR I Wrote a Book…Now What?

  1. Oh, how I chuckled at this – because it’s all so true!! Yes, you should never be embarrased for exactly the reasons you stated. I think my funniest fail is sending my book to a literary agent before I really knew what I was doing. There were tense issues, passive voice issue – lots and lots of issues!!

    I really enjoyed this post, thank you for sharing!!

  2. E.L. – I can relate. I sent out a flash fiction piece that had alternating points of view – in a flash fiction piece! We all make mistakes but it means we’re writing and improving. Now we have time for new mistakes! Thanks for taking the time to read and comment. Much appreciated!

  3. Susan Godenzi on November 17, 2014 at 10:10 pm said:

    Yes, I too can relate to all of this. I also cried when I typed THE END of the first draft of my first novel. I was shocked at how emotional I felt. Yes, I needed a hug too from my very understanding husband. Well, I actually don’t think he understands. But he tries really, really hard to. I love it when I find people who do actually understand and can relate. There is a real bond there.
    Well done with your website, Suzanne. xx

    • Well said, Susan – finding those people whose eyes don’t glaze over when you talk about writing is such a blessing! Welcome and thanks for sharing!

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Before You Hit Send

“It’s hard to take someone seriously when they leave you a note saying, ‘Your ugly.’ My ugly what? The idiot didn’t even know the difference between your and you’re.” ― Cara Lynn Shultz, Spellcaster

Social media has enhanced communication in some ways and diluted it in others. If I were a superhero, I’d wear a cape made of dictionary pages and run around with a magic red pen correcting the Facebook posts and Tweets of those too quick to hit the enter/send buttons.

Even if your friends don’t judge you by the way you communicate, customers, clients and superiors DO. You don’t have to be perfect, you just have to be careful.

If you notice an error after you hit send, give it a beat and then decide if it’s worth following up. Sometimes the answer is yes.

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